It would seem those who didn’t make to their college career and placement center may be in luck compared to previous years 2018 appears to the be the best year for this year’s crop of newly minted college graduates. According to a CareerBuilder, survey companies are in the hiring mode. They are on the hunt for graduates with business and technology degrees.

Also, it seems that starting salaries are in the area of $40,000 or higher depending on your degree. Those who major the STEM areas are looking at salaries between $66,521 – $61,867 depending on your STEM major according to the National Association of College and Employers (NACE). For those who will be graduating with degrees in the Humanities, the outlook also is bright; the starting salary potential is around $56,688. Good news indeed for this year’s graduates.

However, there is still a large segment of college graduates who will end up in that phantom zone space when they graduate this summer with no job prospects in spite of the bright jobs picture for the class of 2018.

These are those individuals who walked past the college career center with “good intentions” of stopping in and asking for help, but, for reasons yet to be explained always found something else to occupy their time. They are part of those students who don’t feel confident in their prospects of finding a job once they graduate.  Sadly, a burden they put on their own back because of failing to make use of the college career center.

Suddenly, the day of reckoning arrives and as they walk across the stage to receive their diploma, it dawns on them, they now have to hustle to find a job that doesn’t involve writing someone coffee order on a paper cup.

There are steps one can take to alleviate the situation, but, it will require acknowledging ones’ situation and putting in the corrective effort that will lead to landing a job.

It starts with developing your strategic job plan of action, an SJPoA. This plan is part of you doing what Lindsey Pollak calls; embracing your stereotype. As she points out in her book Getting from College to Career people will call out your current state, you will not want to hear but, as she pointed out you need to embrace, acknowledge it, and then ask them for their advice on what they did in their job search.

However, there is more to be done, and I invite you to come back as I will put forth some additional details that will help you develop an SJPoA, along with some other insights you may not have considered.

Stay tuned.

© Timothy A. Wilson 2018

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